SQL Server: buffer manager: database pages

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This metric tells you how many database pages are currently being occupied in the data cache. The higher the buffer manager: database pages is, the less room there is for SQL Server to cache more data pages. Read more

Ad hoc query stubs in plan cache

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This metric measures the total number of one-time use ad hoc queries in the plan cache that have been stored in the form of a stub, not as a full execution plan. Read more

Last backup size

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Backups are at the heart of the activities of any DBA. You have to restore the backup to know it is good, but you can get an early alert that something is wrong if your backup size changes rapidly or unexpectedly in a short period of time. Read more

Database file size

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7,469 0
It’s important to measure the growth of databases so you can plan future space requirements, prepare for time periods when heavy volume traffic is expected, and take action in advance to prevent problems such as highly fragmented databases. Read more

Schema modified

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The metric is a necessary step in order to achieve the key purpose of this metric, which is to create an alert that will be raised when something is added to the schema, or the existing schema is modified. Read more

WriteLog wait time

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During a transaction, data is written to the log cache so that it’s ready to be written to the log file on commit, or can be rolled back if necessary. When the log cache is being flushed to disk, the SQL Server session will wait on the WriteLog wait type. Read more

Buffer cache used per database in MB

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Rating: 4.9/5 (7 votes cast)
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Knowing how much of your RAM is committed to each database can help you provision the right amount of RAM to SQL Server. It also helps to identify rogue queries that draw too much data into RAM and force data from other databases out of the cache. Read more